I'm a postgrad student studying for an MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies. It's an interdisciplinary course stealing modules from, well, every discipline possible. This blog is dedicated to all things related to the 15th-17th centuries, and anything else I can justify as relevant. Some of it will be funny things I find on the internet, or reblogs of interesting things. Hopefully a fair amount of it will be my own comments, thoughts and things I've found interesting while studying. My background is in English and history, so literature and history will probably dominate.

May contain dick jokes.

My other blog: http://lifeasashakespeareancomedy.tumblr.com/

Acomb Court Rolls 1544-1760

Here are some of the daft/funny/interesting cases I’ve found so far while looking for information on water supplies, uses, and disputes over water.

Acomb is now part of York, but at this point hadn’t yet been swallowed by urban expansion.

-In 1558 the ale tasters of Acomb were ordered by the manorial court to do their jobs properly.

-In 1572 a Chris. Lermouthe was fined an unknown amount for illegally firing a gun (“gonne”). The records do not indicated that he fired it at anyone, or even at any thing, just that he fired it. As of a statute of 1541/2, the standard fine for this offence for anyone worth less than £100 p.a. was £10. 

-In 1580 Thos. Smythe was presented at court for allowing other men’s children and servants to eat hens in his house at night. He was fined 12 pence (1 shilling).

-In 1600 “all” of the inhabitants of Acomb were fined 3 shillings and 4 pence each for wearing their felt hats on the Sabbath and on feast days. This is the same fine as for not maintaining the well, letting your fence fall into disrepair, or letting your sheep wander on to someone else’s lands.

— 5 days ago
#16thc.  #17thc.  #Acomb  #Acome  #York  #Manor  #courts  #gun  #chickens  #ale  #hats  #manorial courts 

jtotheizzoe:

spacetravelco:

Scientific engravings from 1850

by John Philipps Emslie

(via the Wellcome Collection)

I move to give John Philipps Emslie his own posthumous Tumblr, like now.

(via clockworktardis)

— 5 days ago with 6652 notes
Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh →

(Source: fuckyeahforensics, via gunhilde-reblogs-things)

— 1 week ago with 924 notes

feministwerewolf:

girljanitor:

Lost silent film with all-Native American cast found

The Daughter of Dawn, an 80-minute feature film, was shot in July of 1920 in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge near Lawton, southwest Oklahoma. It was unique in the annals of silent film (or talkies, for that matter) for having a cast of 300 Comanches and Kiowas who brought their own clothes, horses, tipis, everyday props and who told their story without a single reference to the United States Cavalry. It was a love story, a four-person star-crossed romance that ends with the two main characters together happily ever after. There are two buffalo hunt sequences with actual herds of buffalo being chased down by hunters on bareback just as they had done on the Plains 50 years earlier.

The male lead was played by White Parker; another featured female role was played by Wanada Parker. They were the son and daughter of the powerful Comanche chief Quanah Parker, the last of the free Plains Quahadi Comanche warriors. He never lost a battle to United States forces, but, his people sick and starving, he surrendered at Fort Sill in 1875. Quanah was the son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, the daughter of Euro-American settlers who had grown up in the tribe after she was kidnapped as a child by the Comanches who killed her parents. She was the model for Stands With a Fist in Dances with Wolves.

You can watch the first ten minutes of the film here. It is over 90 years old, and was produced by, directed by, and stars only Native American people.

Always reblog when this crosses my dash!

(via gunhilde-reblogs-things)

— 1 week ago with 15202 notes
everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.
(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?


*throws money at Hollywood*

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.

(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

*throws money at Hollywood*

(via secrethistoriesproject)

— 2 weeks ago with 28253 notes
6. Margaret Clap →

secrethistoriesproject:

SHP Reblogs: earlier posts from the vault! New posts coming late May 2014.

secrethistoriesproject:

image

OK, OK, I know perfectly well that Margaret Clap looked nothing like Helen Atkinson-Wood playing the character of ‘Mrs Miggins’ in Blackadder III – she lived about eighty years…

— 2 weeks ago with 84 notes
scifi-fantasy-horror:

The Tudors by GINOGINO

I love studying the 16thc but goddammit the clothes were strange.

scifi-fantasy-horror:

The Tudors by GINOGINO

I love studying the 16thc but goddammit the clothes were strange.

(via grumpybuggeringscientist)

— 4 weeks ago with 838 notes
#tudors  #painting  #16thc  #clothes  #ginogino 

secrethistoriesproject:

SHP Reblogs: earlier posts from the vault! New posts coming late May 2014.

secrethistoriesproject:

26. Agustina de Aragon

What would you do if Napoleon and his army were coming to invade your town?

It’s the 2nd of June, 1808 in Zaragoza, a city in northern Spain. The invading French army have been bombarding the walls for more than two days, and the siege itself has dragged on for the past two weeks. Many of the defending troops are dead, the earthworks protecting one of the town’s main cannons at the Portillo Gate have been destroyed, and the French troops are about to start storming the city walls. 22-year-old Agustina, a young married woman, is up on the walls because she’s bringing food and water to the surviving soldiers. She sees what’s going on and steps forward. Grabbing the cannon-fuse out of the hands of a dead soldier, she fires it into the faces of the invading troops! The sight of a woman firing a cannon both encourages the Zaragozan defenders and horrifies the French troops — according to the legends that have grown up around Agustina, this one moment was enough to turn the direction of the battle, and the town was saved. When the French troops returned in 1809, Agustina again joined the defence on the city walls — however, the city fell, and Agustina relocated to Madrid. She later worked as a vivandiere with the Spanish guerilla fighters, and I’ve turned up some suggestions that she served with Wellington at the Battle of Vitoria. She eventually received a military rank, pension and even a few medals for her efforts! After her death at the age of 71, she was buried with honour in a prestigious church in Zaragoza.

Agustina is sometimes referred to as ‘the Spanish Joan of Arc’, and seems to play a similar role in terms of defining both female heroism and national identity — Franciso de Goya incorporated her into his series of etchings The Disasters of War, and Byron wrote a short (and heavily fictionalised) section about her in the poem Child Harold. There are lots of idealised representations of her — the sketch above, by the artist Juan Galvez, is unusual in that it was made from life. Agustina also seems to have been used as a source of inspiration in later periods — for example,  there was a very popular Spanish-language film made about her in 1950.

However, there are a couple of interesting differences from the Joan of Arc legend. One of these is that Agustina was married with kids — her first husband, Joan Roca Vila-Seca, was also a soldier in the Peninsular War (she later remarried after his death). They had at least one child — there’s some evidence to suggest that Agustina was already pregnant when she was first married at 16. This doesn’t sit particularly well with the image that we tend to have of ‘warrior maidens’ as single and unattached, and ‘mums’ as gentle and nurturing people who don’t generally fire cannons at marauding French soldiers. Byron, for one, imagines Agustina’s husband out of existence, preferring to write about her as motivated by a lover who has died during the siege. (He also writes rubbish like ‘Her fairy form, with more than female grace' and 'Yet are Spain’s maids no race of Amazons, /  But formed for all the witching arts of love’, so personally I think he can STFU). 

There’s also no evidence of her concealing her gender at any point — and while the situation in Zaragoza in 1808 was serious enough that I don’t think anybody minded who was lighting the cannon fuse at that particular moment, her later involvement in the war effort, and the recognition that she got for it, suggests that on some level it was considered acceptable for her to continue serving the national defence while openly female. Historian John Lawrence Tone suggests that while open ‘Amazon-style’ fighting was relatively rare in the Peninsular War, women’s resistance — through taking part in public demonstrations and revolts, stealing goods and weapons to supply the Spanish troops, and providing channels of communication and information to the guerilla groups — played a vital role in the Spanish defeat of Napoleon. And as we so often forget, these are the roles in warfare that, although vitally important for all sorts of reasons, tend to get forgotten about. For every Agustina standing on the barricades, how many other women were quietly providing vital medical care, feeding and clothing the guerilla fighters and nicking gunpowder and bayonets from the French while their backs were turned? (Seriously, they were doing just that — Tone’s article has a fantastic story about Spanish women breaking into the Governor’s mansion in El Ferrol and making off with the entire city’s supply of muskets, which they then handed out to the Spanish men). 

I think Agustina, and the stories that have grown up around her, occupy a really interesting position at the intersection of femininity, soldierliness and patriotism — but I still wouldn’t want to be on the wrong side of a cannon from her!

More:

Google Books link: Bernard Cook, Women in War, a Historical Encyclopedia: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lyZYS_GxglIC&pg=PA4&dq=agustina+de+aragon+women+and+war&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_FwGUaOyOs6A0AWumYCgDQ&ved=0CDEQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=agustina%20de%20aragon%20women%20and%20war&f=false

Google Books link: John Lawrence Tone, ‘Spanish Women in the Resistance to Napoleon’ in Constructing Spanish Womanhood: Female Identity in Modern Spain: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=QTjCtl-9XlAC&pg=PA264&dq=john+lawrence+tone+agustina&hl=en&sa=X&ei=TmQGUcygDPGr0AWC2oGIDQ&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=john%20lawrence%20tone%20agustina&f=false

Short Heritage History bio with timeline: http://www.heritage-history.com/www/heritage.php?Dir=characters&FileName=agustina.php

Read Byron’s Child Harold for yourself: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/5131/5131-h/5131-h.htm

Wikipedia bio: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agustina_de_Arag%C3%B3n

— 1 month ago with 121 notes

whateverfarmanimalofwar:

These are a list of logical fallacies that my history teacher gave us before our debate. I think everyone should know these so they can a) make better arguments and b) be able to accurately and concisely point out flaws in other people’s arguments. Please reblog I think this is really important. 

I’d add failure to cite proper evidence and use of anecdotal rather than quantifiable evidence to imply a trend.

I may start using this blog a little more to discuss developing arguments and critiquing arguments in historical work (partly to help me think about these things for essays).

(via thegentlemananachronism)

— 1 month ago with 41 notes